Canning Index | Canning Introduction | Frequently Asked Questions | Pressure Canning Method
Boiling Water Method | Fruits | Tomatoes and Tomato Products | Vegetables | Meat, Game and Poultry
Fish and Seafood | Stock and Soup | Troubleshooting | Care and Maintenance | Pressure Canner Comparison Guide

 

Preserving Stock and Soup Image

STOCK AND SOUP   CANNING BASICS

Pressure Canning is the ONLY SAFE METHOD for canning stock and soup.

Stock and soup are quickly and easily canned. Generally, vegetable soups are more satisfactory if the stock and vegetables are canned separately and combined at the time of serving.

Adjusting for High Altitude Canning:

  • Dial Gauge Pressure Canner: When pressure canning at altitudes of 2,000 feet or below, process according to specific recipe. When canning at higher altitudes, process according to the Pressure Canning Chart below.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Pressure Canner: When pressure canning at altitudes of 1,000 feet or below, process according to specific recipe. When canning at higher altitudes, process according to the Pressure Canning Chart below.
     
  • Presto Precise® Digital Pressure Canner: When pressure canning, this canner automatically adjusts for altitude. There is no adjustment neccessary.

Altitude Adjustment Chart

PROCEDURES AND RECIPES

To ensure the best and safest home canned product, we recommend reviewing the Canning Introduction link. Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner. Process stock and soup according to the following recipes.

 

BEEF STOCK        pints | quarts

Beef StockSaw or crack fresh trimmed beef bones to enhance extraction of flavor. Rinse bones.

Hot Pack: Place bones in a large pot and cover with water. Cover pot and simmer 3 to 4 hours. Remove bones. Cool broth; skim off and discard fat. Remove bits of meat from bones and add to broth, if desired. Reheat broth to boiling. Fill hot jars with hot broth, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for pressure canning method and canner-specific jar capacity.

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 11 pounds pressure—Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 10 pounds pressure—Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 15 pounds pressure.
     
  • Presto Precise® Digital Canner. Process Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. Canner automatically adjusts for altitude in pressure canning mode.

 

CHICKEN STOCK        pints | quarts

Image of Chicken StockHot Pack: Place large carcass bones in a large pot; add enough water to cover bones. Cover pot and simmer 30 to 45 minutes or until meat can be easily removed from bones. Remove bones. Cool broth; skim off and discard fat. Remove bits of meat from bones and add to broth, if desired. Reheat broth to boiling. Fill hot jars with hot broth, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for pressure canning method and canner-specific jar capacity.

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 11 pounds pressure—Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 10 pounds pressure—Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 15 pounds pressure.
     
  • Presto Precise® Digital Canner. Process Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. Canner automatically adjusts for altitude in pressure canning mode.

 

SOUPS — Vegetable, Dried Bean or Pea, Meat, Poultry, or Seafood*        pints | quarts

Image of VegetablesChoose your favorite vegetables, dried beans or peas, meat, poultry, or seafood ingredients for soup as long as those ingredients have their own individual canning recommendations. Do not use ingredients for which there are no canning recommendations.

Caution! In accordance with USDA guidelines, do not add noodles or other pasta, rice, flour, cream, milk or other thickening agents to home canned soups as processing times may not be adequate.

Hot Pack: Prepare vegetables, meat, poultry, and seafood* as described in the hot pack directions for the individual ingredients. If dried beans or peas are used, they must be fully rehydrated before adding to other ingredients (see vegetables). Combine solid ingredients with meat broth, tomatoes, or water to cover. Boil 5 minutes. Salt to taste, if desired. Fill hot jars halfway with solid ingredients and then add soup liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning*

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for pressure canning method and canner-specific jar capacity.

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 11 pounds pressure—Pints 60 minutes and Quarts 75 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 10 pounds pressure—Pints 60 minutes and Quarts 75 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 15 pounds pressure.
     
  • Presto Precise® Digital Canner. Process Pints 60 minutes and Quarts 75 minutes. Canner automatically adjusts for altitude in pressure canning mode.

*If soup contains seafood, process pints and quarts for 100 minutes.

 

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Canning Index | Canning Introduction | Frequently Asked Questions | Pressure Canning Method
Boiling Water Method | Fruits | Tomatoes and Tomato Products | Vegetables | Meat, Game and Poultry
Fish and Seafood | Stock and Soup | Troubleshooting | Care and Maintenance | Pressure Canner Comparison Guide