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Fish and Seafood | Stock and Soup | Troubleshooting | Care and Maintenance | Pressure Canner Comparison Guide

 

Preserving Fruit Image

FRUITS   CANNING BASICS

Canned Jars of FruitFruits are safely processed using the boiling water method. For instructions on using the boiling water canning method in your pressure canner, click here or in the Presto Precise® Digital pressure canner, click here.

If desired, fruits may also be processed using the pressure canning method in a stovetop pressure canner.

Select firm, fully-ripened but not soft fruit. Do not can overripe foods.

Maintaining Color

Some fruits (apples, apricots, nectarines, peaches, and pears) tend to darken while they are being prepared. To prevent the darkening, place fruit in a solution of 3 grams (3,000 milligrams) ascorbic acid solution to 1 gallon of cold water.

Ascorbic acid is available in different forms:

  • Pure powdered form: Use 1 teaspoon of pure powder, which weighs about 3 grams, per gallon of water.
  • Vitamin C tablets: Buy 500 milligram tablets. Crush and dissolve 6 tablets per gallon of water.
  • Commercially prepared mixes of ascorbic and citric acid: Available under different brand names. Use according to manufacturer’s directions found on the packaging.

Canning Liquids and Sweeteners

Although fruit has better color, shape, and flavor when it is canned with syrup, it may be canned in juices (such as apple, white grape, or pineapple) or water.

White sugar is preferable to brown sugar for canning. Light corn syrup or honey may be used to replace up to one-half the sugar. If you wish to use sugar substitutes, follow package instructions.

Sugar substitutes, Sucralose (Splenda®) and Stevia, can be successfully used if you wish to reduce sugar consumption. Both are heat stable. Sucralose and Stevia used in jams and jellies will require no-sugar needed pectin. It is recommended that you use tested canning recipes that call for the specific sugar substitute.

The amount of sugar desirable to use in preparing syrups will depend upon the tartness of the fruit and on family preference. It should be remembered that fruit, when heated, releases some of its juices which will dilute the syrup in proportion to the juiciness of the fruit.

Use the syrup chart as a guideline for preparing the syrup needed for your canning recipe. The syrup recipe may be doubled or tripled depending upon the packing method and amount of fruit being canned at one time.

Adjusting for High Altitude Canning

  • Dial Gauge Pressure Canner: When pressure canning at altitudes of 2,000 feet or below, process according to specific recipe. When canning at higher altitudes, process according to the Pressure Canning Chart below.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Pressure Canner: When pressure canning at altitudes of 1,000 feet or below, process according to specific recipe. When canning at higher altitudes, process according to the Pressure Canning Chart below.
     
  • Boiling Water Method with Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Pressure Canners: When using the boiling water canning method at altitudes of 1,000 feet or below, process according to specific recipe. When canning at altitudes above 1,000 feet, increase processing time according to the Boiling Water Canning Chart below.

Pressure Canning Altitude ChartBoiling Water Canning Altitude Chart

PROCEDURES AND RECIPES

To ensure the best and safest home canned product, we recommend reviewing the Canning Introduction link. Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner. Process specific fruits according to the following recipes.

 

APPLES        pints | quarts

Wash, peel, and core apples. Cut into 1/2-inch slices. If desired, place apples into ascorbic acid solution to prevent darkening. Drain well.

Hot Pack: Add apples and syrup, juice, or water to a large pot and bring to a boil. Boil for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent scorching. Pack hot apples in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Cover apples with hot syrup, juice, or water, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 8 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 8 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints and Quarts 20 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

APPLESAUCE             pints | quarts

Wash, peel, core, and slice apples. If desired, place apple slices into ascorbic acid solution to prevent darkening. Drain well.

Hot Pack: Place slices in a large pot. Add 1/2 cup water. Heat quickly until apples are tender, stirring occasionally to prevent scorching. Press through food mill or sieve (if chunk style is preferred, omit this step). If desired, sweeten to taste as directed in Fruits Canning Basics. Reheat sauce to boiling. Pack in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints 8 minutes and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints 8 minutes and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints 15 minutes and Quarts 20 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

APRICOTS          pints | quarts

Apricots ImageWash well-ripened, firm apricots. If peeled apricots are desired, dip 1 minute in boiling water, then in cold water and peel. Cut apricots in halves and remove pits. Place apricots in an ascorbic acid solution to prevent darkening during preparation. Drain well.

Hot Pack: Add apricots and syrup, juice, or water to a large pot and bring to a boil. Pack hot apricots, cut side down, in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Raw Pack: Pack raw apricots, cut side down, in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Cover with hot syrup or water, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning (Hot and Raw Pack)

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners.

    Hot Pack: Process Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.
    Raw Pack: Process Pints 25 minutes and Quarts 30 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

BERRIES — Blueberries, Currants, Gooseberries, Huckleberries       pints | quarts

Blueberries ImageChoose ripe, sweet berries with uniform color. Wash 1 or 2 quarts of berries at a time. Drain, cap, and stem if necessary.

Hot Pack: Heat berries in a large pot with boiling water for 30 seconds and drain. Add 1/2 cup hot syrup, juice, or water to hot jars. Pack hot berries into jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Cover with hot syrup, juice, or water, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 8 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 8 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints and Quarts 15 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

BERRIES — Raspberries, Blackberries (not suitable for strawberries)      pints | quarts

Raspberries ImageBlueberries, Currants, Gooseberries, and Huckleberries may also be used with this method.

Choose ripe, sweet berries with uniform color. Wash 1 or 2 quarts of berries at a time. Drain, cap, and stem if necessary.

Raw Pack: Add 1/2 cup hot syrup, juice, or water to hot jars. Pack raw berries into jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Gently shake jars while filling to pack firmly without crushing berries.

Cover with hot syrup, juice, or water, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints 8 minutes and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints 8 minutes and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints 15 minutes and Quarts 20 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

CHERRIES       pints | quarts

Stem and wash cherries. Remove pits, if desired. If pitted, place cherries in an ascorbic acid solution to prevent darkening of the stem end. Drain well. If canning whole cherries, prick each cherry with a clean needle to prevent splitting.

Hot Pack: Heat cherries in a large pot with 1/2 cup syrup, juice, or water per quart of cherries. Cover pot and bring to a boil. Pack hot cherries and cooking liquid in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

HOT PACK PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints 8 minutes and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints 8 minutes and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints 15 minutes and Quarts 20 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

Raw Pack: Add 1/2 cup hot syrup, juice, or water to each hot jar. Pack cherries into hot jars shaking down gently while filling, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Cover with hot syrup, juice, or water, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

RAW PACK PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

NECTARINES — Yellow       pints | quarts

Follow the directions for peaches, but do not dip in hot water to remove skins.

 

PEACHES — Yellow       pints | quarts

Wash fully-ripened but not soft peaches. Loosen skins by dipping peaches 1 minute in boiling water, then in cold water. Peel. Cut peaches in halves and remove pits. Slice if desired. Place peaches in an ascorbic acid solution to prevent darkening during preparation. Drain well.

Hot Pack: Add peaches and syrup, juice, or water to a large pot and bring to a boil. Pack hot peaches, cut side down, in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Raw Pack: Pack raw peaches, cut side down, in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Cover with hot syrup, juice, or water, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning (Hot and Raw Pack)

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners.

    Hot Pack: Process Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.
    Raw Pack: Process Pints 25 minutes and Quarts 30 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

PEARS       pints | quarts

Wash pears. Peel, cut in halves lengthwise, and core. Place pears in an ascorbic acid solution to prevent darkening during preparation. Drain well.

Hot Pack: Add pears and syrup, juice, or water to a large pot and bring to a boil. Boil 5 minutes. Pack hot pears in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Cover with hot syrup, juice, or water, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

PLUMS       pints | quarts

Stem and wash firm, ripe plums. If plums are to be canned whole, prick each side with a fork. Freestone varieties may be cut in halves and pitted.

Hot Pack: Add plums and syrup, juice, or water to a large pot and bring to a boil. Boil 2 minutes. Cover pot and let stand 20 to 30 minutes. Pack hot plums in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Raw Pack: Pack raw plums firmly in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Cover with hot syrup, juice, or water, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints 20 minutes and Quarts 25 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

RHUBARB       pints | quarts

Trim off leaves. Wash stalks and cut into 1/2-inch to 1-inch pieces.

Hot Pack: Add rhubarb and 1/2 cup sugar per quart of rhubarb to a large pot. Let stand until juice appears. Heat rhubarb slowly to boiling. Pack hot rhubarb in hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Remove air bubbles. Clean jar rims. Position lids on jars and adjust bands fingertip tight.

PROCESSING OPTIONS

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for proper canning procedure and canner-specific jar capacity.

Pressure Canning IconPressure Canning

  • Dial Gauge Canner. Process at 6 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 8 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds pressure.
     
  • Weighted Gauge Canner. Process at 5 pounds pressure—Pints and Quarts 8 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, use 10 pounds pressure.

Boiling Water IconBoiling Water Canning

  • Dial Gauge, Weighted Gauge, and Presto Precise® Digital Canners. Process Pints and Quarts 15 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 Assurance of quality image

Canning Index | Canning Introduction | Frequently Asked Questions | Pressure Canning Method
Boiling Water Method | Fruits | Tomatoes and Tomato Products | Vegetables | Meat, Game and Poultry
Fish and Seafood | Stock and Soup | Troubleshooting | Care and Maintenance | Pressure Canner Comparison Guide