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BOILING WATER METHOD
The Boiling Water Method of canning is used for high acid foods such as jams, jellies, fruits, pickles, and salsa. Always follow the method listed on the research-tested recipe.

Current Presto® Pressure Canners function as both a pressure canner and a boiling water canner providing complete versatility and easy storage. See the chart below to determine if your Presto® canner model is adaptable to the Boiling Water Method.

Steps

STEP-BY-STEP DIRECTIONS

Place cooking/canning rack on bottom of canner. Fill canner halfway with water. Preheat water to 140°F for raw-packed foods or 180°F for hot-packed foods.
To prevent canner from pressurizing, remove overpressure plug and pressure regulator from canner cover and set aside. These parts are not needed for the Boiling Water Method.

Use jar lifter to place filled jars straight down, with lids and bands fastened according to manufacturer’s directions, on cooking/canning rack in canner. Check water level. Add more boiling water so the water level is at least 1 inch above jar tops. Turn heat to its highest setting until water boils vigorously.
Look through the vent pipe on the canner cover to be certain it is open before placing cover on canner. To clean the vent pipe, draw a pipe cleaner or small brush through the opening. Place cover on canner (with sealing ring in place), aligning the "V" mark on the cover with the corresponding mark on the body handle and lock securely by turning in the direction indicated to close the cover (clockwise). Cover handles must be centered over body handles. Do not force beyond this position.


Set a timer for the minutes required for processing as listed in the recipe. Lower the heat setting to maintain a gentle boil throughout processing. Add more boiling water, if needed, to keep the water level above the jars.

When jars have been boiled for the recommended time, turn off the heat. Carefully remove the canner cover by lifting it toward you to keep steam away from you when opening. Let canner cool for 5 minutes before removing jars. Using a jar lifter, remove jars by lifting straight up being careful not to tilt them, which causes liquid to siphon from jars. Place jars upright on a towel or cooling rack. Be sure to leave at least a 1-inch space between jars during cooling.

Allow jars to cool naturally 12 to 24 hours before checking for a seal. Do not retighten bands while cooling.

JAM AND FRUIT SPREAD RECIPES
The following recipes are safely canned by the Boiling Water Method. Do not use the Pressure Canning Method on these recipes because the food quality will be unacceptable.

1 cup cooked red-stalked rhubarb (about 1 pound rhubarb and 1/4 cup water)
2 1/2 cups crushed strawberries (about 1 1/2 quarts)
6 1/2 cups sugar
1 pouch liquid pectin

Yield: About 7 or 8 half-pints

Sterilize* Mason jars and prepare lids according to manufacturer's instructions. *If you wish, rather than sterilizing jars the processing time can be increased to 10 minutes. Keep in mind that if your altitude is above 1,000 feet the processing time needs adjustment.

To prepare fruit. Wash rhubarb and slice thin or chop; do not peel. Add water, cover, and simmer until rhubarb is tender, about 1 minute. Sort and wash fully ripe strawberries; remove stems and caps. Crush berries.

To make jam. Measure prepared rhubarb and strawberries into a large pot. Add sugar and stir well. Place on high heat and, stirring constantly, bring quickly to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and stir in pectin. Skim foam, if necessary.

Immediately ladle hot jam into clean, hot, sterile* jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Prepare jar rims. Adjust two-piece lids.

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Half-pints and Pints 5 minutes*. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

5 cups grape juice (about 3 1/2 pounds grapes and about 1 cup water)
1 package powdered pectin
7 cups sugar

Yield: About 8 half-pints

Sterilize* Mason jars and prepare lids according to manufacturer's instructions. *If you wish, rather than sterilizing jars the processing time can be increased to 10 minutes. Keep in mind that if your altitude is above 1,000 feet the processing time needs adjustment.

To prepare juice. Sort, wash, and remove stems from fully ripe grapes. In a large pot crush about 3 1/2 pounds of grapes and add just enough water to cover grapes, about 1 cup. Cover and bring to boil on high heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Pour contents of pot into a damp jelly bag and suspend the bag to drain the juice into a large bowl. Allow juice to drain undisturbed overnight in a cool place. Strain through two thicknesses of damp cheesecloth to remove any crystals that have formed.

To make jelly. In a large pot combine juice and pectin; stir well. Place on high heat and, stirring constantly, bring quickly to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Add sugar, continue stirring, and heat again to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute. Remove from heat; skim off foam quickly.

Immediately ladle hot jelly into clean, hot, sterile* jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Prepare jar rims. Adjust two-piece lids.

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Half-pints and Pints 5 minutes*. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

3 3/4 cups crushed peaches (about 3 pounds peaches)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 package powdered pectin
5 cups sugar

Yield: About 6 half-pints

Sterilize* Mason jars and prepare lids according to manufacturer's instructions. *If you wish, rather than sterilizing jars the processing time can be increased to 10 minutes. Keep in mind that if your altitude is above 1,000 feet the processing time needs adjustment.

To prepare fruit: Sort and wash fully ripe peaches. Remove stems. Loosen skins by dipping peaches 30 to 60 seconds in boiling water, then in cold water. Peel and remove pits. Crush peaches.

To make jam: In a large pot combine crushed peaches, lemon juice and pectin; stir well. Cook on high heat and, stirring constantly, bring quickly to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Add sugar, continue stirring, and heat again to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim foam, if necessary.

Immediately ladle hot jam into clean, hot, sterile* jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Prepare jar rims. Adjust two-piece lids.

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Half-pints and Pints 5 minutes*. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

Rhubarb Strawberry Jam, Grape Jelly, and Peach Jam adapted from "How to make Jellies, Jams, and Preserves at Home." Home and Garden Bulletin No. 56. Extension Service, United States Department of Agriculture. National Center for Home Food Preservation, June 2005.


Use Jonathan, Winesap, Stayman, Golden Delicious, McIntosh, or other tasty apple varieties for good results.

8 pounds apples
2 cups apple cider
2 cups vinegar
2 1/4 cups white sugar
2 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon ground cloves

Yield
: 8 to 9 pints

Sterilize* Mason jars and prepare lids according to manufacturer's instructions. *If you wish, rather than sterilizing jars the processing time can be increased to 10 minutes. Keep in mind that if your altitude is above 1,000 feet the processing time needs adjustment.

Wash apples. Remove stems, quarter and core fruit. Cook apples slowly in apple cider and vinegar until soft. Press fruit through a colander, food mill, or strainer. Cook fruit pulp with sugar and spices. stirring frequently. To test for doneness, remove a spoonful and hold it away from steam for 2 minutes. It is done if the butter remains mounded on the spoon. Another way to determine when the butter is cooked adequately is to spoon a small quantity onto a plate. When a rim of liquid does not separate around the edge of the butter, it is ready for canning.

Ladle hot butter into clean, hot sterile* jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Prepare jar rims. Adjust two-piece lids.

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Half-pints and Pints 5 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

Recipe adapted from the "Complete Guide to Home Canning," Agriculture Information Bulletin No. 539, USDA, revised 2009. National Center for Home Food Preservation.

PICKLE RECIPES
The following recipes are safely canned by the Boiling Water Method. Do not use the Pressure Canning Method on these recipes because the food quality will be unacceptable.

6 pounds 4- to 5-inch pickling cucumbers
8 cups thinly sliced onions (about 3 pounds)
1/2 cup canning or pickling salt
1 cup pickling lime (optional, see below for making firmer pickles)
1/2 cup salt (optional, see below for making firmer pickles)
1 gallon water (optional, see below for making firmer pickles)
4 cups vinegar (5% acidity)
4 1/2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons mustard seed
1 1/2 tablespoons celery seed
1 tablespoon ground turmeric

Yield: About 8 pints

Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch off blossom end and discard. Cut into 3/16-inch slices.* Combine cucumbers and onions in a large bowl. Add canning salt. Cover with 2 inches crushed or cubed ice. Refrigerate 3 to 4 hours, adding more ice as needed. Drain cucumbers and onions.

Prepare clean, hot Mason jars. Prepare lids according to manufacturer’s instructions.

For making pickles: In a large pot combine vinegar and remaining ingredients. Boil 10 minutes. Add cucumbers and onions and slowly reheat to boiling.

Fill hot jars with cucumbers, onions, and hot pickling liquid, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Prepare jar rims. Adjust two-piece lids.

*Optional, for firmer pickles: Mix pickling lime, salt, and water in a 2- to 3-gallon crock or enamelware container. (Caution: Avoid inhaling lime dust while mixing the lime-water solution.) Add cucumbers and soak in lime water for 12 to 24 hours, stirring occasionally. Remove from lime solution and rinse. Cover cucumbers with fresh cold water and soak in refrigerator 1 hour. Drain water from cucumbers. Repeat the rinsing and soaking steps two more times. Handle carefully, as slices will be brittle. Drain well. Go to instructions above "For making pickles."

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Pints and Quarts 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

Storage: After processing and cooling, jars should be stored 4 to 5 weeks to develop ideal flavor.

 

8 pounds 3- to 5-inch pickling cucumbers
2 gallons water
1 1/4 cups canning or pickling salt (divided)
1 1/2 quarts vinegar (5% acidity)
1/4 cup sugar
2 quarts water
2 tablespoons whole mixed pickling spice
about 3 tablespoons whole mustard seed (1 teaspoon per pint jar)
about 14 heads of fresh dill (1 1/2 heads per pint jar) or 4 1/2 tablespoons dill seed (1 1/2 teaspoons per pint jar)

Yield: About 7 to 9 pints

Prepare clean, hot Mason jars. Prepare lids according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch slice off blossom end and discard, but leave 1/4-inch of stem attached. Dissolve 3/4 cup salt in 2 gallons water. Pour over cucumbers and let stand 12 hours. Drain. In a large pot combine vinegar, 1/2 cup salt, sugar, and 2 quarts water. Add mixed pickling spices tied in a clean, white cloth. Heat to boiling. Fill hot jars with cucumbers. Add 1 teaspoon mustard seed and 1 1/2 heads fresh dill per pint. Cover with boiling pickling liquid, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Prepare jar rims. Adjust two-piece lids.

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Pints 10 minutes and Quarts 15 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

3 pounds jalapeño peppers
1 1/2 cups pickling lime (optional, see below for making firmer pepper rings)
1 1/2 gallons water (optional, see below for making firmer pepper rings)
7 1/2 cups cider vinegar (5% acidity)
1 3/4 cups water
2 1/2 tablespoons canning salt
6 tablespoons mustard seed
3 tablespoons celery seed

Yield: About 6 pints

Prepare clean, hot Mason jars. Prepare lids according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Caution: Wear plastic or rubber gloves and do not touch your face while handling or cutting hot peppers. If you do not wear gloves, wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching your face or eyes.

Wash peppers well and slice into 1/4-inch thick slices. Discard stem ends.*

To make pickled pepper rings: In a large pot combine cider vinegar, 1 3/4 cups water and canning salt; heat to boiling. Place 1 tablespoon mustard seed and 1 1/2 teaspons celery seed in the bottom of each hot jar. Fill hot jars with pepper rings, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Cover pepper rings with boiling pickling liquid, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Prepare jar rims. Adjust two-piece lids.

*Optional, for firmer pepper rings: Mix pickling lime and 1 1/2 gallons water in a stainless steel, glass or food grade plastic container. (Caution: Avoid inhaling lime dust while mixing the lime-water solution.) Add peppers and soak in the lime water in refrigerator for 18 hours stirring occasionally (12 to 24 hours may be used). Remove pepper rings from lime solution. Rinse peppers gently but thoroughly with water. Cover pepper rings with fresh cold water and soak, in refrigerator, 1 hour. Drain water from peppers. Repeat the rinsing, soaking, and draining steps two more times, draining thoroughly at the end. Go to instructions above "To make pickled pepper rings."

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Pints 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

2 1/2 to 3 pounds yellow (banana) peppers
4 tablespoons mustard seed
2 tablespoons celery seed
5 cups cider vinegar (5% acidity)
1 1/4 cups water
5 teaspoons canning salt

Yield: About 4 pints

Prepare clean, hot Mason jars. Prepare lids according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Caution: Wear plastic or rubber gloves and do not touch your face while handling or cutting hot peppers. If you do not wear gloves, wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching your face or eyes.

Wash peppers well and remove stem ends; slice peppers in 1/4-inch thick rings. Place 1 tablespoon mustard seed and 1/2 tablespoon celery seed in the bottom of each empty hot jar. Fill hot jars with pepper rings, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

In a large pot combine vinegar, water and salt; heat to boiling. Cover pepper rings with boiling pickling liquid, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Prepare jar rim. Adjust two-piece lids.

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Pints 10 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.

 

SALSA RECIPE
The following recipe is safely canned by the Boiling Water Method. Do not use the Pressure Canning Method on this recipe because the food quality will be unacceptable.

7 quarts peeled, cored, chopped paste or plum tomatoes*
5 cups chopped onion
4 cups seeded, chopped long green chiles
1/2 cup seeded, finely chopped jalapeño peppers
6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 cups bottled lemon or lime juice
2 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon black pepper
3 tablespoons oregano leaves (optional)
2 tablespoons ground cumin (optional)
2 tablespoons fresh cilantro (optional)

*This recipe works best with paste tomatoes. Slicing tomatoes require a much longer initial cooking time to achieve a desirable consistency.

Yield: About 16 to 18 pints

Prepare clean, hot Mason jars. Prepare lids according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Caution: Wear plastic or rubber gloves and do not touch your face while handling or cutting hot peppers. If you do not wear gloves, wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching your face or eyes. The jalapeño peppers do not need to be peeled. The skin of the long green chiles may be tough. If you choose to peel chiles, wash and dry them and then slit each pepper along the side to allow steam to escape. Blister skins by placing peppers in a hot oven (400°F) or under a broiler for 6 to 8 minutes until skins blister. After blistering skins, place peppers in a pan and cover with a damp cloth. Cool several minutes; peel off skins. Discard seeds and chop.

Wash tomatoes and dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or until skins split. Dip in cold water, slip off skins, and remove cores. Combine all ingredients except oregano, cumin, and cilantro in a large pot and bring to a boil, stirring frequently, then reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes. Add oregano, cumin, and cilantro and simmer for another 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Ladle hot salsa into hot jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Prepare jar rims. Adjust two-piece lids.

Boiling Water Canning: Follow step-by-step directions for your pressure canner’s boiling water method. Process Pints 15 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended time.


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